Ten Thousand Cents — Aaron Koblin

Ten Thousand CentsAaron Koblin’s piece is a digital artwork reproduction of the $100 bill. The piece has 10,000 individually/uniquely reproduced tiles that represent a small part of the bill. He developed a home-brew drawing tool and through Amazon Mechanical Turk (a labor distribution service from Amazon AWS), requested people to recreate a certain tile of the bill. The custom tool monitored their brush strokes from start to finish. The worker was not told of the bigger picture being reproduced. The project’s site allows the audience to click any part of the bill and view the digital reproduction of the piece. Ten Thousand Cents digs into the Fluxus art movement, perhaps on a more modern level. The piece promotes, in some ways, living art created through a form of crowdsourced social networking. The piece is also avant-garde, digging into experimental and distinctive forms of art. The author states that the movement delves into “uncharted combination of digital labor markets, crowdsourcing, virtual economies, and digital reproduction.” Koblin’s goal was to observe the reproduction process and final result of the bill through the eyes of each of the workers. The Amazon AWS crowdsourcing, the custom drawing tool, and the sticking tools took time and effort to create and coordinate. The piece is truly of the most striking and interesting, as the entire design and process are methods I have never come across. The best part is looking at the individual tiles and even some of the off topic sketches that some drew.

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Life Processed

1.

Processing’s static mode follows a list of calls for an entered function and exits when complete. Active mode runs continuously, i.e. to draw something.

2. 

Changed i<20 to i<100
100 Ellipses:

100 Ellipses
size(400,400);
float x;
float y;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i = i+1)
{
x = random(360);
y = random(360);
ellipse(x+20, y+20, 20,20);
}

Random Colors:

100 Random Colors
size(400,400);
float x;
float y;
fill(100, 100, 100, 50);
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i = i+1)
{
x = random(360);
y = random(360);
fill( random(255), random(255), random(255), random(255));
ellipse(x+20, y+20, 20,20);
}

3. Boxes

Boxes

final int CANVAS_WIDTH = 400; //fill in your desired width here
final int CANVAS_HEIGHT = 400; //fill in desired height here

//setup runs once at the beginning of the program run
void setup() {
size(CANVAS_WIDTH, CANVAS_HEIGHT);
smooth();
frameRate(.5); //Refreshes image every 2 seconds

//comment the following out if you want animation
//noLoop(); //this sets the draw function to only run once
}

int pos = 0;

//function runs many times per second until program ends
void draw()
{
pos++;
if (pos > width)
{
pos = 0;
}
int i = 1;
int j = 1;
drawingRectangles(i,j);
}

//name this helper function with a meaningful name for you
void drawingRectangles(float x, float y){
size(400,400);

fill(100, 100, 100, 50);
background(0, 100, 200);
for (int i = 0; i < 20; i = i+1)
{
x = random(300); // calls for random positions of boxes
y = random(300);
fill( random(100), random(255), random(255), random(255)); // random colors
rect(x+20, y+20, 25,45);
if (key == ‘s’) //to start capturing every refresh, press s.
{ //It will continue capturing till program is stopped
saveFrame(“line-####.jpeg”);
}
}
}

Glitchia Munn

Glitchy Olivia Munn

This glitch art features artifacts over Olvia Munn. The piece is about the computerized deception modern photography has leveed on the photographic scene. Perfection is now hard to believe due to photo manipulation. The glitches add the aspect of imperfections.

topic two (Part 2)

Nam Jun Paik had significantly experienced the polarization of cultural and conventional traditions throughout his time in the United States. His works typically carry themes like the human interactions and anti-commercialism. As an artist, he attempted to bring out unintended uses in electronics, as seen in the two discussed installations.

Zen for Film Installment by Nam Jun Paik
Zen for Film
Installment by Nam Jun Paik (Paik Art Center – 2012 exhibition)

Nam Jun Paik’s installation of Zen for Film effortlessly characterizes the Fluxus movement of the mid-20th century. His installation featured a powered 16 mm film projector set at a certain distance from a bare white wall. A reel presents 14 minutes of nothing. A small projection bounces off the wall, presenting a small, square-shaped beam of light, on an otherwise dark wall. The piece stems to the movement through the “anti-art” employment. It chides the period’s emerging visual representations in films and challenges the viewers to not focus on what is presented through film, but at the machinery itself and the casted light.

Electronic Superhighway Installment by Nam Jun Paik
Electronic Superhighway
Installment by Nam Jun Paik (Smithsonian American Art Museum – 2006 exhibition)

Paik’s Electronic Superhighway combines fifty-one unique channels distributed to hundreds of Sony televisions, each block of televisions of the same channel bordered by neon. The neon lights and the television placements represent the United States. His cybernetic installation aims to emphasize the way our country has been molded by the television and films; moreover, how central the medium had become as a staple concept of American culture and tradition. The various sound bites, playing along with the flashing videos of moving individuals, aim to fully illustrate the complex chaos this cybernetic world has created.

topic two (Part 1)

The goal of my Realized Artworks piece was to find something simple enough for students to find, but still have the able to create some unique art pieces. Using a specific sketching site, students were given slightly arbitrary recipe of directions paired with measurements to draw lines and shapes. The sketching site creates certain glows and waves that change with stroke speed and direction. The sketch that the student would draw would appear as an actual face, assisted by the site’s canvas mirroring of the drawn strokes of the student. But depending on their speed of drawing and their take on measurements, each piece would appear dramatically different in detail, but rather standard as a whole.